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The design and architectural work of David Goss embodies a balance of bold,
contemporary vision and understated calm. You could say ditto for David
himself: blending daring imagination with quiet confidence, he continues to go
places. With creative projects that take him from home base in Collingwood
to California, Mexico and Oman, David shares his consuming passions!

The design and architectural work of David Goss embodies a balance of bold, contemporary vision and understated calm. You could say ditto for David himself: blending daring imagination with quiet confidence, he continues to go places. With creative projects that take him from home base in Collingwood to California, Mexico and Oman, David shares his consuming passions!

What led you to become an architect and designer?

I was always making stuff and was obsessed with Lego. Spaces and objects, and how things are put together, has always inspired me. I wanted to make furniture, so first I studied industrial design, changing at the last minute from painting at VCA. From there, I moved into architecture. It’s weird when you grow older and think, I’m a product of my parents. Dad’s an engineer and Mum works with flowers and food, so what I do is like a balance of them both.


How would you describe your design approach?

It’s more intuitive than deliberate. I like to explore the immediate context and adjacency, and find what’s authentic. Personally, I prefer to create spaces that make people feel at ease and don’t scream for attention. It all depends on the brief. A showroom needs to be uplifting and inspiring, but with just enough design. Other times, design is the primary focus, and everything will stand out. We just did the full package in Cape Schanck – the house, the light fittings, door handles and furniture. Part of getting a design feeling cohesive is the teamwork. It’s about building relationships with all kinds of makers. You’re constantly problem-solving, but with a good team the process is more seamless, and it’s really fun. I feel lucky to do it.

What led you to become an architect and designer?

I was always making stuff and was obsessed with Lego. Spaces and objects, and how things are put together, has always inspired me. I wanted to make furniture, so first I studied industrial design, changing at the last minute from painting at VCA. From there, I moved into architecture. It’s weird when you grow older and think, I’m a product of my parents. Dad’s an engineer and Mum works with flowers and food, so what I do is like a balance of them both.


How would you describe your design approach?

It’s more intuitive than deliberate. I like to explore the immediate context and adjacency, and find what’s authentic. Personally, I prefer to create spaces that make people feel at ease and don’t scream for attention. It all depends on the brief. A showroom needs to be uplifting and inspiring, but with just enough design. Other times, design is the primary focus, and everything will stand out. We just did the full package in Cape Schanck – the house, the light fittings, door handles and furniture. Part of getting a design feeling cohesive is the teamwork. It’s about building relationships with all kinds of makers. You’re constantly problem-solving, but with a good team the process is more seamless, and it’s really fun. I feel lucky to do it.

Do you have any particular influences?
There are so many, but Luis Barragán is a Mexican architect I keep coming back to. His works are very minimalist – block rendered brick walls, but in hot pink and purple and yellow. The spaces are very contemplative, almost spiritual in a sense. I was in Mexico before lockdown and found the place so rich and colourful. I also love Japan, how bold they can be but also sensitive, with a real reverence around craft. And I’d like to spend more time in Sri Lanka. Geoffrey Bawa was an architect there that I’m inspired by. I learnt a lot more by going and being in that environment.

It seems that travel has been a great part of your life.
Travel’s always been there from the start. We spent our first three years in Taipei, then the UK, before coming back for school. The most inspiring trip was to Zimbabwe when I was a teenager, as part of a chamber string orchestra. That was mind-blowing, especially coming from regional Victoria. So again, music – and understanding how things are put together to create a feeling.

Are there other creative fields that inspire you?
I’ve always been really into graphics. And film clips give me a buzz. Innately what we do is see how stuff is constructed, so I tend to look at clips the same way. I’m music obsessed and spend way too much time discovering and deep diving. There’s also art; and books and films inspire me. Pedro Almodóvar has really interesting stories and I love the world he creates visually: lots of crazy colour with the aesthetics dialled up a notch.

Do you have any particular influences?
There are so many, but Luis Barragán is a Mexican architect I keep coming back to. His works are very minimalist – block rendered brick walls, but in hot pink and purple and yellow. The spaces are very contemplative, almost spiritual in a sense. I was in Mexico before lockdown and found the place so rich and colourful. I also love Japan, how bold they can be but also sensitive, with a real reverence around craft. And I’d like to spend more time in Sri Lanka. Geoffrey Bawa was an architect there that I’m inspired by. I learnt a lot more by going and being in that environment.

It seems that travel has been a great part of your life.
Travel’s always been there from the start. We spent our first three years in Taipei, then the UK, before coming back for school. The most inspiring trip was to Zimbabwe when I was a teenager, as part of a chamber string orchestra. That was mind-blowing, especially coming from regional Victoria. So again, music – and understanding how things are put together to create a feeling.

Are there other creative fields that inspire you?
I’ve always been really into graphics. And film clips give me a buzz. Innately what we do is see how stuff is constructed, so I tend to look at clips the same way. I’m music obsessed and spend way too much time discovering and deep diving. There’s also art; and books and films inspire me. Pedro Almodóvar has really interesting stories and I love the world he creates visually: lots of crazy colour with the aesthetics dialled up a notch.

How do you unwind after work?
There’s not really an off switch. We’re always analysing and thinking, and taking things in. I’ll get an idea late at night and have to get it down, or you go to bed thinking about it. To relax I’ll run around the river, listening to music. omething I discovered during lockdown was how amazing the river is. It’s so close to home and the studio, yet it feels like you’re in the bush.


What’s next on the horizon for you and Studio Goss?
There are a few larger architectural projects I’d like to start. A hotel would be amazing – to create the full experience and really curate someone’s whole journey through that space. I’m also excited to do more work overseas. There’s a sense of inspiration of just being somewhere else, outside the everyday – though I enjoy the diversity of the neighbourhood around here. At some point, I’d also like to work on my own home and make that a Studio Goss project. In terms of the future, this work doesn’t really have an end date: you’re constantly looking, making and being creative.

How do you unwind after work?
There’s not really an off switch. We’re always analysing and thinking, and taking things in. I’ll get an idea late at night and have to get it down, or you go to bed thinking about it. To relax I’ll run around the river, listening to music. Something I discovered during lockdown was how amazing the river is. It’s so close to home and the studio, yet it feels like you’re in the bush.


What’s next on the horizon for you and Studio Goss?
There are a few larger architectural projects I’d like to start. A hotel would be amazing – to create the full experience and really curate someone’s whole journey through that space. I’m also excited to do more work overseas. There’s a sense of inspiration of just being somewhere else, outside the everyday – though I enjoy the diversity of the neighbourhood around here. At some point, I’d also like to work on my own home and make that a Studio Goss project. In terms of the future, this work doesn’t really have an end date: you’re constantly looking, making and being creative.

Market Lane Coffee, Brunswick. David and his studio blended key features of the existing 70s shopfront – including the bronze facade and terracotta tiles – with a warm, wood finish as a nod to the shop and gallery upstairs. The result is a dramatic transformation, reflective of the site’s heritage and local character.

Market Lane Coffee, Brunswick. David and his studio blended key features of the existing 70s shopfront – including the bronze facade and terracotta tiles – with a warm, wood finish as a nod to the shop and gallery upstairs. The result is a dramatic transformation, reflective of the site’s heritage and local character.

We’d like to express our gratitude to David for inviting us into the inspirational
world of Studio Goss. Whether cycling off to a Brunswick worksite,
or travelling abroad to oversee a polished new build, the smartly designed
Kidmans always make for a comfortable choice.

We’d like to express our gratitude to David for inviting us into the inspirational
world of Studio Goss. Whether cycling off to a Brunswick worksite, or travelling abroad to oversee a polished new build, his smartly designed Kidmans always make a comfortable choice.

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February 9, 2024

Leader of the Pack

Leader of the Pack

Ryan Ackers was inspired to work with animals from the start, but it took a strong connection with man’s best friend to make the switch from the world of business to the fields of Winchelsea, where he is responsible for overseeing the rearing and shepherding of sheep and cattle as a livestock manager. Also an experienced bull handler and passionate dog trainer, today Ryan is happiest doing what he feels he was meant to do all along.

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